Gin Heritage

1269
1269

First Juniper based drinks

First Juniper based drinks
The first major mention of juniper-based health-related drinks appeared in a Dutch encyclopaedic work Der Naturen Bloeme (The flower of Nature) by Jacob van Maerlant. Ever since, gin has been used for medicinal purposes: The Royal Navy, for example, mixed gin with lime cordial to stop scurvy. Given that tonic water contains quinine (an anti-malarial drug), it seems that gin and tonics are beneficial after all!
1618
1618

Dutch Courage

Dutch Courage
Gin originated in Holland English soldiers came into contact with ‘genever’ during the Thirty Years’War (1618-1648). The expression ‘Dutch Courage’ dates from the habit of soldiers having a nip of genever before going to battle
1639
1639

The Distillers’ Company founded in London

The Distillers’ Company founded in London
The Distillers’ Company was established in London to regulate the distilling trade. They soon published ‘The distiller of London’.
1663
1663

Distilleries in Amsterdam alone rise to 400

By 1663, numerous small Dutch and Flemish distillers (some 400 in Amsterdam alone by 1663) had popularized the re-distillation of malt spirit or malt wine with juniper. This was used to treat medical problems including kidney ailments, lumbago, stomach ailments, gallstones, and gout.
1689
1689

William of Orange liberalized gin distilling

William of Orange liberalized gin distilling
In London, on the 11th of April 1689, the Dutch ruler William III – better known as William of Orange – was crowned at Westminster Abbey as the new King of England, Scotland and Ireland. He quickly liberalized gin distilling, imposed a heavy duty on French wines and increased tax on beer. This kick-started an alcohol revolution: the drink of choice, once beer, was now gin.
1690
1690

Gin overtook production of beer and ale

Gin production grew quickly, soon overtaking that of beer and ale, and cemented William as one of the most famous monarchs in history.
1720
1720

Gin Craze: 25% of population of London distilled Gin themselves

By 1720, in London, a quarter of all houses were actively distilling gin and consumption had risen from 2.5 million to 8.2 million gallons. The working classes seemed permanently inebriated, public health suffered, people became simply unemployable, and life expectancy dropped significantly.
1736
1736

The Gin Riots

The Gin Riots
The abuse of alcohol and Gin by the poor became a major problem. This was addressed by The Gin Act in 1736: a law that rose the price of the spirit and consequently caused mass riots and widespread anger. At this time, 11 million gallons of gin were distilled in London: a  figure over 20 times larger than it had been in 1690. In 1751, English artist William Hogarth created two prints in support of what would become the second Gin Act: Beer Street and Gin Lane. Designed to be viewed alongside each other, these works depict the evils of the consumption of gin in contrast to the merits of drinking beer. The second Gin Act was successfully passed later that year and the Gin Craze finally began to wane.
1832
1832

The invention of the column still

The column still was invented in 1832, making the distillation of neutral spirits practical and enabling the creation of the “London dry” gin: a less sweet but more delicate variation of the traditional “Old Tom” developed later in the 19th century.
1850
1850

THE BIRTH OF THE GIN AND TONIC

In tropical British colonies gin was used to mask the bitter flavour of quinine, which was the only effective anti-malarial compound. Quinine was dissolved in carbonated water to form tonic water; the resulting mix became the origin of today’s popular gin and tonic combination – and the G&T was born
1920
1920

Gin triumphed in the first ‘Cocktail Age’

Gin triumphed in the 1920s – the first ‘Cocktail Age’ – after having been scarce during the 1914-18 World War. Now recognised as a cosmopolitan and refreshing drink, gin became the darling of the famous Cunard cruises. During the 1920s and 1930s the newly popular idea of the ‘Cocktail-Party’ crossed the Atlantic from the USA to Britain via an American hostess who wanted to fill in for her friends the blank time between teatime and dinner. The famous Martini was born!
2016
2016

START OF SEARCH VINTAGE RECEIPE GIN1689

START OF SEARCH VINTAGE RECEIPE GIN1689
2018
2018

LAUNCH OF GIN 1689

LAUNCH OF GIN 1689

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